Facts on Automobiles and Motorcycles Mileage

When an economic phenomenon known as the “oil price hike” hit the global market in the seventies, consumers and motorists alike began searching for other means of transportation. In the past, fuel efficiency in a vehicle was but a minor factor in choosing a car or a truck. Today, however, when gas prices rise week after week, gas mileage has become an imperative facet in purchasing a vehicle. But motorists are finding out that even the most fuel-efficient cars are no match to the rapid fuel price inflation.

Alongside the current condition concerning automobiles and their mileage is the gas motorcycle boom. People have been discovering that motorcycle mileage fares way better than that of an automobile. Compared to even a well-driven small car, motorcycle mileage seems to get the upper hand. This is made evident in the 100 miles a gas-powered motorcycle run with just a gallon against some 40 to 45 miles a gallon for a small car. And if a gas is priced at $5.00 a gallon, a motorcycle owner is therefore, ensured to run 100 miles with just $5.00. Mileage-wise, of course the motorcycle is a way more cost-efficient ride compared to a car.

With these factors in mind, there is no wonder should motorcycle sales begin to rise in the years to come. The foremost driving point for such a phenomenon is money, and how much of it a motorist could save with a motorcycle as a mode of transportation. Plus, it is a less-stressful drive to know that a gallon’s worth of gas can take you a hundred-miles’ worth of destinations. That’s a longer drive and a wider scope at a lower price.

One more major boon to owning a motorcycle is its environmental implications. You see, because of its high mileage, motorcycles correspondingly burn less fuel compared to a sedan or an SUV. This ultimately results to lesser carbon monoxide being released into the atmosphere. Motorcycle drivers can enjoy a guilt-free ride around town. Of course, there is the issue of having to do away with certain amenities available in a car once one decides to switch to driving a motorcycle. But if fuel-efficiency and optimum mileage are your main concerns, the lack of comfort (in a car) would not matter that much at all. After all, isn’t spending less for gas a comfort in itself?

Overall, the argument between a motorcycle and an automobile as a ride depends on who’s deciding or who’s going to get behind the wheel. A driver’s decision to make or not make a switch between the vehicles rests on his or her needs as a motorist. Sure, when it comes to protection from exposure to the elements, the automobile easily wins the vote. But, should the argument be about which mode of transportation give the most miles at the least price? The motorcycle wins by a landslide; comfort can always take a back seat. And besides, who gets to be lucky enough to save money and save the earth all at once? Only motorcyclists do.